Accumulating small bits and scraps of art glass is inevitable but nothing ever goes to waste. For this project I made a few pot-melts, AKA aperture pours, which is tossing glass scrap into a terracotta flowerpot and heating until it dribbles out the bottom of the pot. There are ways and means of trying to control the outcome of the design but mostly you won’t know until post-firing.

I’ll post more about pot-melts later but this was an especially interesting one. My good friend, Nicki sent me a large batch of pink tiles she had made for the annual warmglass.com magless event. These were left-overs and I was using them for a separate fund-raising event.

The pink tile is shown in the middle – I used maybe 20. You can see the melted glass residue in the terracotta pot bottom post-fire.

This is a better photo of the result. I could not have planned or predicted this – it’s really pretty!

More close-ups of other pot-melts…

This  cranberry pink bowl is grouped with the pot-melts but is actually called a ‘high fire’. Made by piling select scrap in a flat terracotta saucer; when allowed to melt and spread out within that confined area, it becomes a round flat disc. The edges of this are a bit irregular but I left it that way – it has character.

As time was approaching for the delivery dead-line I made a few more simple two-layer bowls using Bullseye glass streaky glass. It comes in sheets of white and clear; black and clear and french vanilla and clear. By pairing a circle cut from each of these with a contrasting base it was a fast way to make a pretty and functional bowl. I failed to get a good picture of these here is a hint.

Thank you to Mary Farina, a Facebook friend who saw my posts on the project and volunteered to send this beautiful bowl. This will be placed in the Silent Auction and will fly out the door! Find Mary at facebook.com/gratefulglass.

by Mary Farina at Grateful Glass

Thank you for those that came in to make a bowl and more. Many people contacted me but were unable to attend the scheduled times. I still appreciate that you tried. Christy K.  made the kiln-carved blue bowl with clouds and spirals. She escaped before I could take her photo.

This is Bonnie wondering if her design needs another vitrigraph stringer for her perfect design; after she had already mastered the aloe gel technique. Thank you Bonnie for driving to far to join us. It was a pleasure having you.

Then there is Brandy – potter, photographer, and all-round good spirit. Brandy is a do-er and she proved that in the studio – literally. She made great bowls but also cleaned up behind us; washed and ground glass, cleaned, signed and photographed the bowls. She is credited with a portion of the photos posted. Find Brandy here.

By the way, she has a bit of an owl fetish…

See you at Jacoby Arts Center on Saturday November 3rd for the Empty Bowls project benefiting Crisis Food Center.  Faye & Friends

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On a 9×12 blank I placed four of the commercial brass stencils representing different types of leaves and ferns. Those were blasted and then placed irid side UP and capped with opaque turquoise 0116. It looked oh! so pretty! in the kiln with only the turquoise showing – then I flipped it over to find the entire surface had reacted, except one small corner. The edge of a fern was peeking out a bit from a swamp of deep russet brown. [edit in photo when found]

Not one to give up a good sheet of glass, I embellished the turquoise surface with hand-pulled stringers and finally got a predictable reaction on the surface. The odd backside is now a “feature” of this interesting piece – hah!

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By making small trinkets and functional dishes utilizing different methods and colors of copper-bearing glass; most of the sheet was used up. I’m certain the backing to the platter was from the very edge of the sheet.

Firing schedules for inital fuses (Denver CS-60 or Paragon Pearl 22):

  1. 300 – 1050 – 15
  2. 75 – 1275 – 15
  3. 350 – 1460 – 10
  4. 9999 – 900 – 60
  5. 160 – 700 – 0
  6. 200 – 200 – 0

BE suggests cutting the top layer (reactive ice) slightly larger than base. Strictly guesswork on my part but maybe it aids in stretching and breaking up the irid surface so the crackle can develop. I did not stick to this guideline due to the thin rim of irid peeking out on the bottom after firing. The top and base were cut flush. This could be a good design element by removing the thin layer of irid at the border before putting the piece together. The result would be a decorative border around the piece.

The next pieces are kiln-carved using 1/8th fiber paper under the entire piece. I thought that it would disrupt the irid enough to leave a distinct pattern but it did not. A nice little kiln-carving but certainly no different than using regular irid.

It matters ( a LOT) what part of the sheet the reactive ice irid is cut from. The irid is thinner or a different color. I think the sheet I was working from was a rainbow irid which would have silver irid on the other edges; or the iridizing was thinner.IceEdgeIrid

This is again turquoise 1116 or light turquoise 1416. The spiral shape on the left tray (at top) appears to have a darker design but is a trick of the light. There is light transmission through the darker areas but lying flat it appears a very dark russet brown.

An Attempt was made to kiln-carve using fiber paper cut into leaves with emerald green 1417. There was no reaction at all in spite of multiple firings. The refires were to try and correct signifcant trapped bubbles between base and irid, around the leaf shape. I surrendered after 3 tries.

Descriptions of outcomes while working with Reactive Ice Irid:

 In the cold sheet Reactive Ice appears clear. On my last order I jokingly told the BE sales rep I didn’t trust myself to have more than one deceptive glass on-hand at a time. There’s some truth in that so I ordered just the one sheet, with a plan to use it up in a short period of experimenting with the copper-bearing glasses. A list of those are on the BE website – all in the blue family of colors.

Use of the irid facing down toward the base sheet should give a crackled effect. I sand-blasted designs on the irid side to reveal more of the reactive surface with the intent to have a darker design within a field of crackle. I was pleased with the way it worked out. The interior irid flashes copper and bronze which complements the turquoise.

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The above design was hand-cut on the fly from an aboriginal sun design using sand-blast resist. For the two trinket dishes (below) I used a brass commercial stencil and blasted away the irid in a fern leaf design. The glass is light aquamarine 1408.

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