Accumulating small bits and scraps of art glass is inevitable but nothing ever goes to waste. For this project I made a few pot-melts, AKA aperture pours, which is tossing glass scrap into a terracotta flowerpot and heating until it dribbles out the bottom of the pot. There are ways and means of trying to control the outcome of the design but mostly you won’t know until post-firing.

I’ll post more about pot-melts later but this was an especially interesting one. My good friend, Nicki sent me a large batch of pink tiles she had made for the annual warmglass.com magless event. These were left-overs and I was using them for a separate fund-raising event.

The pink tile is shown in the middle – I used maybe 20. You can see the melted glass residue in the terracotta pot bottom post-fire.

This is a better photo of the result. I could not have planned or predicted this – it’s really pretty!

More close-ups of other pot-melts…

This  cranberry pink bowl is grouped with the pot-melts but is actually called a ‘high fire’. Made by piling select scrap in a flat terracotta saucer; when allowed to melt and spread out within that confined area, it becomes a round flat disc. The edges of this are a bit irregular but I left it that way – it has character.

As time was approaching for the delivery dead-line I made a few more simple two-layer bowls using Bullseye glass streaky glass. It comes in sheets of white and clear; black and clear and french vanilla and clear. By pairing a circle cut from each of these with a contrasting base it was a fast way to make a pretty and functional bowl. I failed to get a good picture of these here is a hint.

Thank you to Mary Farina, a Facebook friend who saw my posts on the project and volunteered to send this beautiful bowl. This will be placed in the Silent Auction and will fly out the door! Find Mary at facebook.com/gratefulglass.

by Mary Farina at Grateful Glass

Thank you for those that came in to make a bowl and more. Many people contacted me but were unable to attend the scheduled times. I still appreciate that you tried. Christy K.  made the kiln-carved blue bowl with clouds and spirals. She escaped before I could take her photo.

This is Bonnie wondering if her design needs another vitrigraph stringer for her perfect design; after she had already mastered the aloe gel technique. Thank you Bonnie for driving to far to join us. It was a pleasure having you.

Then there is Brandy – potter, photographer, and all-round good spirit. Brandy is a do-er and she proved that in the studio – literally. She made great bowls but also cleaned up behind us; washed and ground glass, cleaned, signed and photographed the bowls. She is credited with a portion of the photos posted. Find Brandy here.

By the way, she has a bit of an owl fetish…

See you at Jacoby Arts Center on Saturday November 3rd for the Empty Bowls project benefiting Crisis Food Center.  Faye & Friends

Kathryn Nahorski was awarded with the Visionary Leadership in the Arts Award at this year’s Arts and Champagne gala held on September 2012 at the Jacoby Arts Center in Alton, Illinois. She has served in many capacities at JAC including; eight years on the board of directors (formerly known as Madison County Arts Council); five years as the first executive director; then two more years as Assistant Director of Education for the Jacoby Art Center.

I was proud to be asked to create something unique and special to honor Ms. Nahorski.

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To support Jacoby Arts Center, local artists donate art to be auctioned off in a ‘silent auction’ during the Arts & Champagne event.

This year’s contribution was one of my favorite “nests”. An over-sized shallow form developed with vitrigraphs – varying shades of brown and ivory glass heated to molten,  then stretched and curled to become the nest’s twigs. The eggs are glowing dichroic glass.

On a 9×12 blank I placed four of the commercial brass stencils representing different types of leaves and ferns. Those were blasted and then placed irid side UP and capped with opaque turquoise 0116. It looked oh! so pretty! in the kiln with only the turquoise showing – then I flipped it over to find the entire surface had reacted, except one small corner. The edge of a fern was peeking out a bit from a swamp of deep russet brown. [edit in photo when found]

Not one to give up a good sheet of glass, I embellished the turquoise surface with hand-pulled stringers and finally got a predictable reaction on the surface. The odd backside is now a “feature” of this interesting piece – hah!

turqFVdetail

turqFVplate

By making small trinkets and functional dishes utilizing different methods and colors of copper-bearing glass; most of the sheet was used up. I’m certain the backing to the platter was from the very edge of the sheet.

Firing schedules for inital fuses (Denver CS-60 or Paragon Pearl 22):

  1. 300 – 1050 – 15
  2. 75 – 1275 – 15
  3. 350 – 1460 – 10
  4. 9999 – 900 – 60
  5. 160 – 700 – 0
  6. 200 – 200 – 0